Make Your Own Kokedama Hanging Garden

by Adeline

In the previous post, kokedama was introduced as a way to update your potted plant collection. Kokedama is Japanese for moss ball and it’s basically a ball of soil that’s covered with moss. It is a free-form planting method that’s derived from the bonsai. This unique way of planting can be hung up with strings or stand on its own, making it a beautiful home decor addition to the home.

To make your own, these are the steps to follow:

What you need!

  • Tiny plants (succulents are a good start!)
  • Peat soil
  • Cacti Soil
  • Clay mud
  • Dry Sphagnum moss
  • Scissors
  • 100 percent cotton thread
  • Colourful packing string
  • Gloves
  • Jar of water
  • Bowl to keep the mess in (optional)

What to do!

1. Remove as much soil as possible to expose the roots of the plant. Be careful during this process to prevent snapping the roots.

2. Mix peat soil, cacti soil and mud clay together with a little water over a bowl to contain the mess. The mixture should be moist enough to form a dough-like consistency and hold itself together in a ball without falling apart.

3. Make sure the ball of soil as small as possible but large enough to accommodate the roots of the plant.

4. Wrap sphagnum moss carefully around the roots of the plant to form a circular and compact shape.

Wrap moss around the soil ball

5. Tie cotton string around the sphagnum moss to keep everything in place.

6. Make a small hole in the soil ball and gently press the plant inside. “Close up” the ball by reshaping it into a ball.

7. Press small sheets of moss firmly into the soil ball. Try not to leave any open spaces.

8. To string it up, wrap the string or twine around the ball and leave enough extra strings on each side so it can be hung.

Care Guide

Different plants require different needs such as food, water and amount of sunlight.

Watering: Weight is a good indicator to gauge whether the plant needs watering. Hold the ball in your hand and check whether it feels heavy. If it is, the plant does not need water. If it is light, soak the root ball in a bowl of water for 2 to 3 minutes and squeeze gently after to remove excess water. The root ball should have absorbed enough water to last a week.

Light: Determine whether the plants need lots of sunlight or shade-tolerant and adjust accordingly.

Temperature and humidity: Most indoor plants are shade-tolerant and prefer a humid atmosphere.

Ventilation: Proper ventilation is needed for good plant growth.

Here’s an illustrated guide!

Images to illustrate the steps are from Good Housekeeping

Feature images from Eugenie Fleurat and These Four Walls

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